Categories
Life Skills Parenting Technology Tutorial Ubuntu

Making Roblox Work on Ubuntu in Windows 7 on Virtual Box

IMPORTANT! THIS BLOG POST IS BEING TESTED NOW AND NEEDS SOME WORK. I EXPECT TO UPDATE / IMPROVE THIS AT LEAST ONE MORE TIME. IT’S HERE JUST FOR TESTING PURPOSES. NOTE ALSO THAT AS OF TODAY, EVEN IF YOU GET THIS ALL DONE YOU COULD GET THE SAME ‘KICKED BECAUSE OF WEIRD BEHAVIOUR’ MESSAGE (OR WHATEVER IT’S CALLED). OF COURSE, FEEL FREE TO TRY IT OUT AND LEAVE COMMENTS WHILE I’M ALSO CHECKING IT! 🙂

0. Background

Kids wanted roblox. I hate windows. Roblox only works on Windows. Therefore by deduction, I also hate Roblx. They made their setup so you can play only on windows, android and maybe ios (never checked). But no linux.. what? Serious? A goofy downloadable plugin-app-game kind of thing in 2020? But let’s move on. The fact is, I compromised and made a concession that this setup will be only for this one box for this one purpose and that’s it. I had an old windows 7 machine sticker on one of my ubuntu machines.

1. Find a windows 7 cd rom or some ISO..somewhere…somehow…

Actually this step probably took a whole day. Hadn’t done this in years and windows is so lame that you have to buy their operating system (which isn’t worth paying for) and yeah. So I found some random link online and downloaded windows 7 .iso file professional to match my windows sticker (legitimate key). The fact they even made it hard to download something you already paid for was additional fuel for my Windows fire…

2. Download Virtualbox on Ubuntu

I think this is in the software centre in most Ubuntu Distros. Just search it, install it. Tip: in ubuntu software centre you need to type the whole word for it to show up easily, so ‘virtualbox’ instead of ‘virtual box’

3. Install Windows on Virtualbox

Just start up a “new” machine and point it to your downloaded ISO above. Do the usual windows install that we used to do back when we were slaves…I just accepted all the default suggestions for setting up the box and then adjusted them later. This helps assure a successful install, I believe.

4. Install Guest Additions

This section I’m breaking into two pieces because I’m not 100% sure what’s best. I ‘think’ it depends on what Windows you are using as to whether you need to install guest additions in safe or ‘regular / unsafe’ mode. At least, that’s what my hours of web-searching taught me… So, you can ‘try’ the regular unsafe mode (skip ahead) or, you can do ‘safe mode’ which takes longer and is more annoying. In either case, some of the steps / process might help you along the way so maybe worth a quick read.

A. Installing in ‘Safe’ Mode [this section needs checking / testing]

If you already tried installing guest additions in ‘unsafe mode’you might need to remove guest additions before trying again in safe mode. That’s what I did, anyway. Let’s get this done:

  • When windows is booting you press F8.
  • Choose ‘safe mode with networking’
  • In the Virtual box menu in guest machine window, go to the ‘Devices’ menu
  • Insert Guest additions from bottom of the drop down menu
  • go to ‘start’ menu then ‘my computer’ and the CD rom (in windows)
  • in the ROM directory, double click ‘vboxwindowsadditions-amd64’ (assuming you are 64 architecture…) and a wizard should start
  • Check the ‘direct3D support (experimental)’ checkbox
  • Click ‘install’
  • You may get ‘trust Oracle?’ messages. Even if they can’t be trusted it’s easier to check the box and move on. After all, this is already a highly questionable game and enterprise…
  • Reboot? yes
  • I have notes that said I got a message like “Accept ‘basic 3D’ but I can’t confirm. If you get this, I think you should accept it…
  • After machine comes back, skip ahead and do all the 2D and 3D steps in section below

Here is a helpful [link](this link helped: https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?t=55226) by the way

B. Installing in ‘Unsafe’ Mode

This part got me bad. I also had no idea about ‘Guest Additions’ somehow, so this turned out to be a good learning experience. What ‘guest additions’ does is basically install this big package which gives you more direct and quality connections to the host machines hardware. Before installing I was getting all sorts of video card driver errors. When I opened Roblox Studio it was asking to upgrade to OpenGL 2.0 or higher.

To do this step it was as simple as going to ‘Devices’ and ‘install guest additions’ and walking through the steps. Then it opened a wizard on Windows and walked through the install of the guest addition stuff. Finally it asked for a reboot and when it came back things were already working a bit better. But I was still getting driver errors on Roblox Studio…this ultimately froze the program and demanded to close program which I did. I noticed also that in my ‘device manager’ and then ‘display adaptor’ now it’s listing ‘virtualbox graphics adapter’ which should be best since it’s grabbing host hardware. And this is why I ended up doing all the steps in the ‘safe mode’ section above…

check to see if 3D acceleration is enabled by opening ‘run’ and typing ‘dxdiag’. This link will help if that sounds hard. You should see 3D acceleration as ‘enabled’.Try a round of Roblox? 🙂

5. Enable 3D acceleration in Virtualbox

This one sucked another hour or two of my short life so hopefully this can save you the pain. After doing all of the above I was still getting error after error. In my ‘Directx’ settings I was getting ‘direct3d not available’ messages and another setting ‘not available’. I assumed that Virtualbox would have installed 3D acceleration stuff by default but that was a bad assumption because probably Virtualbox is used by a lot of non-gaming developers who don’t need it nor the drain on the host hardware resources. Anyway, there is likely a good reason for it but the 3D acceleration wasn’t enabled. To enable it, shut down the guest machine, go to ‘settings’ (yellow cogwheel) then ‘display’ then check the 2d and 3d acceleration checkboxes (Not sure if i need 2D but I just wanted to be sure. Probably you should do section 6 below too before starting machine and save a step. Video card stuff may also be linked to the dreaded ‘roblox kicked unexpected client behavior’ message…

A helpful link about 3d acceration stuff.

6. Boosted video memory

I also noticed an ‘invalid setting’ in virtualbox saying that I was less than 27MB of video memory so I raised it from 16MB up to 32 to see if that made things better in the settings of the guest machine.

7. Overcoming the ‘roblox kicked unexpected client behavior’ issue

Frankly, I don’t have the answer yet but working on it. It ‘seems’ unsolvable for both Wine and Virtualbox in Ubuntu but I don’t quit easily. For now it would be nice to have others help on this one since I did all the heavy lifting. I feel there might be a browser hack or some other simple work around to stop the player from getting kicked for no reason.

Categories
Freedom and Privacy Technology Tutorial Ubuntu

How to use this Bmap Tool Thing…

So someone said ‘use bmap tools instead of dd because it’s faster and better’.
It sounded good but as usual when I went searching for documentaion on how to simply use this tool I was left in another command line dizziness. You can check their read me file on the git repository here for yourself if you’d like. This blog here was also even better than the read me file, so thanks to whoever this is as well.

So, hopefully this blog will help you step by step setting things up because I can confirm indeed this thing is blazingly fast compared to dd or other direct image copying things!

Assumptions

  • you are running Ubuntu
  • You know how to find your terminal and type in it
  • you want to flash / copy something to something 🙂

1. Get Bmap

sudo apt install bmap-tools if you have not done so already. This will install in ubuntu

2. Create your Bmap file

This is the thing that seemed to be not explained anywhere well. So what this step does it it creates a file formatted as ‘.bmap’. It’s an xml file. Somehow this file is what makes the magic work so if you create it with the bmap tool and use it in the bmap command line, copying is way faster.

Name your bmap file

You can name this file anything you want. I chose to call it something completely different from my image file so that I don’t accidentally type a wrong command. In my case I was flashing a pinephone image to a micro SD card so I named the bmap file ‘pphone.bmap’ and then the image file remained the way I downloaded it as ‘ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz’.

Select a location

Next, select a nice directory on your computer where you want to run these commands. You can make your own directory or just use the Downloads directory – it’s up to you. I’ll use “Downloads’ for my example.

Run the bmap file creation command

This part here will create the bmap file now that you’ve thought everything through. Just open a terminal and enter this:

bmaptool create /path/to/your/image > /path/where/you/want/bmap/file/saved/bmapfilename.bmap

Here is my actual example with some filled in info:

bmaptool create ~/Downloads/ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz > ~/Downloads/pphone.bmap

— PLAY BY PLAY COMMAND COMMENTARY —

  • ‘bmaptool’ calls the app.
  • ‘create’ : a bmap tool command that says ‘make a bmap file’
  • ~/Downloads/ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz: the location of your image
  • ‘>’ thing is… who knows! But it does stuff
  • ~/Downloads/pphone.bmap: destination of where you want your .bmap file to end up.

Press enter and you should see an output in your terminal something like this:


bmaptool: WARNING: all 826.3 MiB are mapped, no holes in ‘/home/wt/Downloads/ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz’
bmaptool: WARNING: was the image handled incorrectly and holes were expanded?

wt@wt-Lemur:~$ cd Downloads/


Not sure what the warnings were but it seemed to be ok 🙂

3. Copy / Flash your image to your desintation drive, card, whatever

Now that you have your .bmap file created (and you should go to that directory to make sure before proceeding, by the way) you are ready to start blazingly fast copying! Woot woot. This is a simple change from the command above. If you look at my example, I think you’ll figure it out pretty quick.

Note 1: Sudo required for this one.
Note 2: Be CAREFUL before you hit the enter key because if you map this to the wrong desintation, you could damage stuff. I always remove any external drives I don’t want to accidentally kill 🙂

sudo bmaptool copy --bmap ~/path/where/your/bmap/file/is/located /path/where/your/image/is/located /path/to/memory/device

Here is my example with stuff filled in:

sudo bmaptool copy --bmap ~/Downloads/pphone.bmap ~/Downloads/ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz /dev/mmcblk0

  • — PLAY BY PLAY COMMAND COMMENTARY —
  • ‘sudo’ -gives you super powers
  • ‘bmaptool’ calls the app.
  • ‘copy’ is the command to copy (smart name…)
  • ‘–bmap’ : says ‘hey! here’s my bmap file so you copy this thing fast”
  • ‘~/Downloads/pphone.bmap’ : this is the path to my bmap file
  • ‘~/Downloads/ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz’ : this is the location of my image that I want to flash onto something. In my example it’s the pinephone image
  • ‘/dev/mmcblk0’ : the destination of where you want your .bmap file to end up. This this case it’s the SD memory card but yours could be /sdc /sda or whatever depending.

Here is the output of my terminal doing this. I find it’s helpful to see terminal stuff so you don’t think you’re going crazy if stuff looks bad in your opinion 🙂


bmaptool: info: block map format version 2.0
bmaptool: info: 211529 blocks of size 4096 (826.3 MiB), mapped 211529 blocks (826.3 MiB or 100.0%)
bmaptool: info: copying image ‘ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz’ to block device ‘/dev/mmcblk0’ using bmap file ‘pphone.bmap’
bmaptool: WARNING: failed to enable I/O optimization, expect suboptimal speed (reason: cannot switch to the ‘noop’ I/O scheduler: [Errno 22] Invalid argument)
bmaptool: info: 100% copied

bmaptool: ERROR: checksum mismatch for blocks range 0-211528: calculated 92c113dde2f5836ccdfc756c2713965bcbd49e5fd9208f0ff89bba4df904f3e2, should be e8648c7193ae920c23de5dcbb23be9ecdca0c94dbfd16b4c003ec9f0511e4406 (image file /home/wt/Downloads/ubuntu-touch-pinephone.img.xz)


Well hopefully this blog was good payback for the nice guy who recommended it. Definitely it’s a time saver and ‘not so hard’ if you have some instruction.

Categories
Life Skills Tutorial Ubuntu

Getting Korean Hangul Working on Ubuntu 18 and higher

How to install Korean Hangul Keyboard Ubuntu Gnome 18

In Ubuntu there are two things that need to happen to be able to type a non-native language into the operating system. You need to get the fonts and the stuff and you then need to configure stuff so the keyboard knows what to do. Without doing both, nothing will work and you’ll think things are broken.

Part 1 – Getting your Korean Language Fonts and Stuff Installed on Machine

  1. super key (sometimes erroneously called the ‘windows key’)
  2. start typing’languages’
  3. Select ‘language and region’ option (may not be top, largest option)
  4. Click the’manage installed languages’ button
  5. If you get the ‘language support is not installed completely select ‘install’. you will be prompted for your admin pass
  6. Click the ‘install/remove lanaguages’ button (on the same ‘Language SUpport’ window. NOTE: This window seems to get easily hidden by other stuff but you can find it again easily in the left launcher while it’s open)
  7. Start typing ‘Ko..’ to trigger the search of ‘Korean’ language when the list of language and their checkboxes appear
  8. select ‘Korean’ and ‘apply’ you will again be prompted for your admin pass. If you are coming from another less secure operating system this is about securing your computer against weird scripts and making sure what is happening is authorized…At this point fonts start downloading and the ‘applying changes’ window is on your screen. This takes a little while sometimes.

Remember, nothing will work yet. You have to do the next section 😉

Now, important little tip here. You need to REBOOT your system now to assure that the input sources in the next steps are refreshed. I cannot tell you how many hours I have burned on this one so just to be sure, take a second to reboot the machine now before continuing.

Part 2 – Getting Input Source Setup So You Can Actually Use the Language

  1. On the same page ‘Language and Region’, under ‘Input Sources’ section, hit the plus + button. I should state here that if for some reason you aren’t seeing what I”m seeing here, just hit your super key and then ‘settings’ and then go to “language & Region” from there. Sometimes stuff moves around…
  2. Hit the 3 dot vertical hamburger icon looking option at the bottom of the list… admittedly this step and the next are not intuitive so feel free to file a GUI suggestion with the fine folks who make Gnome. 🙂
  3. By hitting that option a search field opens up which you’d think would allow you to type ‘Korean’ or ‘Hangul’ and then find your language – but in this case you’d be incorrect for thinking that. What you need to do is scroll to the bottom of this list and selecting ‘Other’. You can alternatively type ‘Ot’ into the search field here…but you cannot type anything more than ‘Ot’ Admittedly this part is plain bad for design… so probably just use the scroll feature here to avoid thinking it’s missing, lol.
  4. Now you are able to use the search field to type ‘Korean’ and / or scroll down to find it. So go ahead and do that now…
  5. You wil see ‘Korean’ and “Korean(101/104 key compatible)” but those are just decoys! Pure deception! The one you want is called “Korean(hangul)”. I have no idea what the other ones are or do but I do know they don’t work for me. Again, if you don’t see this specific option now, you probably didn’t listen to me above and didn’t reboot your machine so be a good student and go ahead and reboot that now…

After it’s highlighted in your list, select the ‘add’ button which should change to a green colour when it’s ready. You should now be brought back to the “Language and Region’ screen and see ‘Korean(Hangul)’ in your list of ‘Input Sources’ You should also notice in the top right area where your wifi, battery, other stuff is that the symbol for your native language has appeared with a drop down arrow. In my case it’s English so I see ‘en’ with the down arrow.

Technically now you have Korean installed and a keyboard input ready to go but a quick tutorial on setting up and using it is probably wise…

Setting up and Using Korean Keyboard

Probably, if you’re like me, you’ve already hit the down arrow, switched to the ‘Ko’ (Korean) option and started typing only to find that it’s still typing English. Why is that after all this work? Because Korean keyboard input is able to type both English and Korean so you have to be able to – while in KO mode – switch back and forth. So what keys do that?

First, let’s take a look at how to switch between input sources. On the Language & Region screen, if you hit the ‘Options’ button (which appeared after you installed Korean) you can now see the key combos to switch between ‘en’ and ‘ko’. This is useful because I find that most of the time I want to be in ‘en’ because my fingers sometimes switch me to Korean accidentally during the day when I don’t need it. The default combo is ‘super’ + space bar. What is ‘super’? See above. It’s the powerful key to the left of the space bar sometimes erroneously called the ‘windows key’. Hit that with space bar and you’ll be able to switch.

Next, while in ‘korean mode’ how to switch between English and Korean? The default appears to be ‘shift + space bar’ (while in Korean mode).

You can make this combo whatever you want by one of two methods:
a) while in Korean mode, hitting the top ‘EN’ drop down in top menu of screen. This will then give you the IBUS ‘setup’ option. I like this way to adjust things. However you can also find it by
b) going to language and Region page, highlighting Korean(hangul) in input sources and hitting the settings cogwheel. Same-same….

Nice. Now you’re typing 강남 style.

Hope this helps. Should have made a video but yeah whatever too late.