Tag: owncloud

How to Use Owncloud Sync on Ubuntu Phone

Congrats! So you figured out the 20 steps to getting owncloud-sync on your ubuntu phone.  The problem is … now what? How do you make it work?  It took a bit of goofing around but here is what I figured out:

Sync Files

  1. Do my tutorial (if it’s not in the software center when you read this) HERE
  2. Go to ‘system settings’
  3. go to ‘accounts’
  4. then add an account and select ‘owncloud’ from the list. It will prompt you for your credentials so fill them in.

Now you have an owncloud (nextcloud works fine with it) account meshed into your phone.  Now you can actually start doing useful things.  The most exciting part, of course, is syncing calendars!

  1. go to calendar icon
  2. click that grid calendar icon in the top right area – the left most of the three
  3. add online calendar
  4. owncloud
  5. again you will be prompted for your credentials again.  enter them
  6. done. you’ll see a ‘sync in progress’ kind of notifier and boom. works.

Now you want to sync up files from your phone to your cloud.  Unfortunately the app does not yet, at the point of this post, have a ‘share to cloud’ option which is too bad.  I’m sure the feature is on the way as you read this.  For now, however, what you have to do is this:

  1. in file manager, create a dedicated ‘sync’ folder on your local phone.  you could use the folders that are already there, but in my case I needed to have a folder that did *not* sync my personal photos to my work cloud!  So I made a folder called ‘work-uploads’ on my phone
  2. open the owncloud app and in account settings choose your sync frequency. I chose 15 minutes.  I left the ‘sync on mobile data’ off because I don’t want a few gigs syncing with my mobile data..
  3. go back then go to sync folders.  for the local folder, select the one you made in step 2 above. You can also create the folder at this point by pressing the + icon, or you could select one.  If you select be sure to press the check mark in the *top right*. Not sure why but the check mark in the center confuses me…
  4. back out then in the ‘sync service’ make sure there is a file in your local folder that you made in step 2 and then press ‘sync’.  It should tell you that the sync has started.

Honestly, mine is not syncing but I bet it should be. haha  It’s definitely connecting to the cloud because I could choose the folders no problem and see all of them on my cloud.  But the files aren’t moving from my phone to the cloud now so hopefully it will work for you while I figure this out.

I think you have to follow these steps in order and not use the owncloud sync app before you add the stuff in system settings but not sure…

two theories:

  1. because i created the folders on the phone it requires root (sudo) somehow to sync.  I noticed that I cannot see the folders I created in step 2 above in the regular file manager of phone…  maybe this permission issue is restricting sync
  2. I did something in the wrong order…  calendar is working perfectly though!  weird.

To test, I went in from my laptop to the web GUI of Nextcloud to see if the file made it.  No go.  Did not.  Then I put a small file in the same directory from my laptop and sure enough the file made it to the cloud.  So the issue is definitely on the phone side… hmm… more for tomorrow..

 

Tags : , , , , , ,

How to Install Nextcloud Owncloud App on Ubuntu Phone

Before you begin: Always first check in the stock ubuntu software center to make sure that it’s not simply available there first.  As of the date of this post it is not, but I expect it will be there very soon.  Do not proceed with this tutorial if there is a one click app in the software center 🙂

1 Go to this link on your Ubuntu phone browser, follow the installation instructions.

http://open.uappexplorer.com

2 Scroll down until you see the ‘Open Store’ app

(image coming).

Click ‘install’ and it will show you the 4 steps you have to follow.  Follow them.  Do them. Love them.  However, if you aren’t awesome with difficult stuff, I’ll expand on each step:

  1. download the openstore thing: click it.  It will download.  Then at bottom of browser, slide up again and it will bring you back to instruction page
  2. your terminal app is the black thing on your main home screen of phone (image coming).  open that.
  3. to navigate to your downloads file, in your terminal app, type this:   cd ~/Downloads
  4. for the ‘run the command’ simply copy the pkcon install-local – – allow-untrusted openstore.openstore-team_0… stuff’ to your phones clipboard by pushing and holding.  Long slide from the right side of your screen. paste it in your terminal with a long push on screen and then enter key by pushing the keyboard icon lower right.

3 Go back to the link above and scroll down until you see the owncloud file sync app and click the ‘install’ button.  It will give you a warning that you are about to kill your phone and ruin your life.  Accept this because life is short.

4 Install again (you’ll see an orange install button down a bit after the warning screen)

5 Go back to your home screen of phone and the owncloud app will be waiting for you.  When you open it enter your owncloud or nextcloud credentials and server location

From here you should be able to connect a shared calendar and also share files and backup files.  I’ll do a quick tutorial on that at my next available minute but hopefully this helps a few people out.

 

 

Tags : , , , , , ,

How to Sync a Calendar Between Owncloud/Nextcloud and Thunderbird Lightning

01_nextcloud_lightning

For some reason this is not that intuitive the first time and there don’t seem to be many/any specific tutorials out there.  I kept getting a ‘modification fail’ error message or other errors. So, here you go:

In Nextcloud/Owncloud

1. Log in to your browser-based owncloud/nextcloud page

2. Go to the top left and click the down arrow to access the calendar app

Note: this *must* be enabled first by your admin, if you happen also to be your own admin

01_nextcloud_lightning

3. Grab the caldav link from the … share icon drop down

02_nextcloud_lightning

4. Select the content of the link and copy it to your clipboard (control A/Control C)

03_nextcloud_lightning

Back in Thunderbird Lightning

Note: You must first have the Lightning add-on installed in Thunderbird if yours does not already have it.  It should come default but I recall in the past it did not…

Now skip past step #10 in this tutorial, and start at the ‘Back in Thunderbird Lightning’ steps

The key point is that it is ‘caldav’ that you select, *not* ical.

 

Tags : , , , , ,

Tutorial: How to Make NextCloud/Owncloud Calendar Work on Iphone Ipod

Unlike my typical tutorial formats, this one will be a near copy/paste from an email I sent to a real person so that other real people can connect this to their real brain and emotions:


Dear _____,

I’m going to forewarn you that this email is dripping with anger/frustration so try to just plunder through it and even try to enjoy it if you can….

Apple/mac is nuts.  I can’t put into words how much I can’t stand the company.

They do everything under the sun to make their users dumb and compliant – in fact, it’s creepy if you think about this….  I remember now (after this morning) why I full scale boycotted Apple and threw this iPod in the ‘smartphone trash pile’.

I will stop my rant here.

<insulting section about all iphone users removed>

But, back to  the solution because at this point I just want to get our calendars working for the next few months, but please let me put in a plug here to strongly consider the company you are supporting and know that yes, there is a way to totally escape the Apple corporation forever.   – It’s called Ubuntu. I hope your next move is far away from these guys…  I leave it with you and I promise to dedicate all my free time to helping you if/when you are ready to make the move.  Until then I hope I never have to turn this stupid thing on again:

Do this in this impossible-to-imagine difficult workaround solution, and I hope by God’s grace that your ‘issue’ is the same one I’m having here which has everything to do with the Fruit Co. and their ‘ways’.,,,

1. go to ‘settings’
2. go to ‘mail/contacts/calendars, etc’
3. add account
4. go to ‘other’ (because they weren’t respectful enough to give calDav and iCal a title or it’s own option space)
5. add calDAV account (*not* calendar subscription because it seems this fruit co can’t make this work without upgrading to the $10,000 phone or buying the latest fruit air laptop to go with it…??)
6. server: YOURSERVER.COM
7. user name: YOURCLOUDUSERNAME
8. password: your cloud password
9. description: your creative name for calendars
10. hit ‘next’

now here is where it gets *real lame*.  It will say want to continue without SSL? Sure, no problem:

11. continue (yes, i will move forward without SSL)(why? Because fruit co is not secure so why bother with https? in fact, let’s make it *not work at all*)(let’s encrypt is legit SSL and it doesn’t want to work)
12. you will get  “unable to verify account information” error.  Why?  No reason. Just because they want you to use their systems…  but let’s overcome!
13. ‘ok’
14. advanced settings
15. change whatever port number is listed there to 80
16. make sure SSL is off (should be)
17. go back (which somehow saves these settings even though there was no indication saving was happening..?)
18. hit ‘next’
19. but it doesn’t work! cannot verify account details blah blah?  why? Because for no explainable reason, the advanced settings just randomly chose its own URL for the calendar – randomly – as if somehow Fruit Corporation is supposed to know where your calendar is hosted?  no problem. let’s overcome…
20. hit ‘advanced settings’
21. make sure the ‘account URL’ is set exactly to this: http://YOURSERVER.COM:80/YOURSUBDIRECTORY/remote.php/dav/principals/users/YOURUSERNAME/
22. go back
23. done (which somehow means save?)

Here is a summary of what the two screens should look like to make it more simple to make sure you ‘followed their rules’

1.

account: ON
server: YOURSERVER.COM
user name: YOURCLOUDUSERNAME
password: YOUR CLOUD PASSWORD
descxription: some long url probably

2. advanced settings screen

advanced settings:
use ssl: off
port: 80
account url: http://YOURSERVER.COM:80/YOURSUBDIRECTORY/remote.php/dav/principals/users/YOURCLOUDUSERNAME/

Now, you *BETTER* report back to me that this @#$#$@#$@#$@#$  is working or I’ll @#$@#$

<SMASHES FACE ON DESK>

Wayne Out There


 

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Fix Owncloud Maintenance Mode Message Ubuntu Server

Did and upgrade to your Ubuntu packages and owncloud is mucked up?  Same.  So I blogged this because it happens all the time and I always forget how to do it quickly. Hope this helps you, too:

  1. Access your server via terminal (ssh in)
  2. move to your owncloud directory.  Mine is default and if yours is too copying and pasting this should work: cd /var/www/owncloud/config
  3. edit the config.php file: sudo nano config.php
  4.  scroll down and change the word ‘true’ to ‘false’ besides maintenance mode
  5. control x to exit
  6. ‘y’ to save it

Done.

There is apparently an even easier way to do this in a single command which I have not yet tried found here which I will try next time. Command looks like this. Again, I have *not* tested this but it looks promising:

sudo -u www-data php occ maintenance:mode –on

and I’m further guessing that you could change the last part to read –off to turn maintenance mode off…

UPDATE: I tested the above command and it couldn’t seem to find said ‘occ’ in the command.  Not sure.  So the top of my tutorial works, though steps 1 to 6…

Tags : , , , ,

Stuff that Matters (STM): Digital Privacy for the People

WD-and-OC

And, the ‘new series’ to compliment the new category ‘Question the Magic (QTM)’ is ‘STM’ (stuff that matters).

There is a flurry of stuff, especially in tech, flying at us. Most of that is white noise, but all of it matters because I’ve learned from people (like my ghost writer) that you are either travelling down the slippery slope to bondage under corporations and government, or freedom and civil rights.  You are on a path right now.

Today this article really caught my attention.  I already have Owncloud running in my home to make sure I have a convenient way to access my personal data.  I know this system is amazing and ‘somewhat open source’ base on my limited review of the licensing and companies behind it.  It’s by far the ‘most free’ and ‘most cool’ one out there.  I also used to use Pogoplug, but became quite concerned that although the machine was physically in my home, you had to log into the machine through the pogoplug servers…. that seemed to me at the time like the wrong path to travel.  I even hacked it and made it work with a different OS but it never worked awesome.

So what does it all do?  It’s having your own ‘cloud’ but having it safely in your house, instead of the possibly corrupt households of others like google, apple, and the like.  Right now most people are syncing their personal lives, usually unknowingly, onto computers of other people.  Everything they have said and done for the last few years is sitting on someone else’s computer.  Not good.

This new ‘team’ of a well-funded corporation like Western Digital has a lot of potential – depending on the ethics of WD.  I honestly don’t know anything about them.  The ‘corporation-meets-free-software’ relationship works very well for the free Ubuntu project with Canonical as one of it’s funding machines to make sure a good thing doesn’t fade into ‘just another good idea’ category.

If WD really gets behind owncloud, and I were the corporation of Alphabet soup, I’d be very, very concerned.

And this will tie into another ‘STM’ article that I will publish either tomorrow or the next day depending on availability of coffee.

 

 

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Free Android CalDav Calendar Sync with Owncloud

After a long, long, time, the solution to syncing my Owncloud calendar to Android was bloody easy.  The reason why I couldn’t get it done is because it seems that google (no surprise) blocks these kind of tools from their app place.  They like to have things like your daily schedule and whereabouts nicely available for exploiting.

If you don’t like that, until the Ubuntu phone calendar synch is up and running and a calendar is paramount, this solution worked awesome for me.  If you don’t have an owncloud set up in your own house and the calendar set up, I have some post on this site about that but my friend reported that it’s overly and unecessarily complicated.  Check it out and compare it against others and do your best.

The second assumption is that you can manually download and install a .apk file on your phone.  I’m pretty sure that all android phones can do this if you go into the security settings and force it to allow non-play apps to install.  I’m running Cyanogen mod on a rooted phone so it definitely works…

Assumptions:

  1. owncloud + calendar is up and running (or some other network-sharable calendar)
  2. you can download/install .apk files on your android mobile

How to:

1. On your mobile, Go to this link https://f-droid.org/repository/browse/?fdid=org.gege.caldavsyncadapter

2.Make sure your mobile security settings are set to allow ‘install any .apk file’ or the next step might not work

3. Click and download the ‘download apk’ link which will start download.

4. Click the download complete notification and it should start install

5. in phone settings under ‘accounts’ click ‘add account’ and chose calDav Sync adapter

6. Enter your calendar credentials (ie. from owncloud) and make it do its thing

7. Done

In my case I had to reboot my phone once to make it do a full and perfect sync but hopefully that won’t happen to you. It was some kind of ‘time out error’.  After rebooting all was good.

 

Tags : , , , , , ,

Weird Bug Fix for Crashing Owncloud Client on Ubuntu 14.04:Segmentation Fault (core dumped)

Not that most of you are going to ever see this or care, but as for me, I just spent about 6 hours over the last few weeks trying to resolve it so I hope as a public service this will help someone both fix their client and save some time!

Background:

My Ubuntu owncloud client was working just fine on my netbook.  Then I made a change to the server where the URL changed where owncloud was hosted.  On one machine, I simply booted up owncloud, changed the setting and everything worked.  On the other machine, it would not forget the former URL and something went wacky inside.  I hope you like my terminology.  Anyways, I took the time and courage to just start trying to delete everything from my netbook related to owncloud and reinstall but that didn’t work either.  Finally, this is what worked (assuming you have opened a terminal window):

1. sudo apt-get purge owncloud-client

2. sudo apt-get autoremove owncloud-client

3. go to your home folder and totally delete the owncloud folder (make sure you save anything that might be in it and not synced to your server!)

4. KEY STEP

a) cd /tmp

b) ls

You should now see at least one directory that starts with sni-qt_owncloud_3658-HTGzH (or something along those lines).  In my case, I had many of them which I thought to be a problem.  So, I deleted them all and this was the step that fixed everything.  How to delete?

c) rm -rvf sni-qt ….

d) repeat steps  ‘b’ and ‘c’ above until all traces of these sni-qt directories are *totally gone*

5. Reinstall owncloud-client

sudo apt-get install owncloud-client

NOTE: It’s probably better, although I didn’t try, to instead open your software centre and install it from here.  I found my icon didn’t show up using the command line here in the terminal…. sup to you….

6. start owncloud by just typing ‘owncloud’ or by searching for it the normal way you open programs.

7. go into your ‘settings’ and make sure your server settings are correct.

Everything should now be working

Hope that helped and if you have time and energy please file this blog with the owncloud open source team.  I ran out of time….

Tags : , , , , , ,

How to Privatize Your Calendar with Owncloud, Thunderbird, and Lightning

Edit 151224: I had accidentally selected ‘ics’ format instead of caldav.  Sorry about that. Now it works!

Getting your calendar off other  people’s servers should be a priority.  It’s bad enough that you’re being tracked unwillingly but throwing your daily calendar out there to be viewed is borderline twisted.

I needed a solution where the sync was happening on a machine in my house, not outside.  This tutorial got it done for me.  I refuse to say anything good about fruit phones or the fruit company, but I will say that if you are temporarily stuck with one that oddly it quite easily syncs with this tutorial as well giving you the very useful access on your mobile complete with alerts.  I have not yet figured out Android and rest assured I’ve spent many, many hours trying.  My main goal is to focus all my attention on Ubuntu for Devices (Ubuntu Touch/Mobile) but sometimes you just have to survive today…

Before beginning, you will need:

1. an Ubuntu server in your house with owncloud installed on it (that’s a separate tutorial)

2. a static IP address for that server, or at least a dyn dns service (some domain hosts offer it for free) so that when you are outside of your house you can tunnel back in.

*note: you only need one person running the items above if you trust them dearly because you could just set your calendar up on their server.  You could put countless thousands on one machine I bet.  I’m going to set up my family on mine, for example

3. A computer (preferably Ubuntu) running Thunderbird as your email client.

4. The plugin Lightning installed into Thunderbird.

5. a valid and functional email working in Thunderbird (you could use a free webmail email here but that kind of defeats our purpose of freeing ourselves from these gaffers)

Assuming all of the above is set up and ready, here is what you do:

In Thunderbird/Lightning

1. create a new calendar in Thunderbird/Lightning by going to file/new/calendar in the menu options at the top.  Don’t worry about too much and at this point we’ll choose ‘on our computer’ when you get to that point.  We will delete this calendar later anyways so don’t get too attached

file-new-calendar-2

2. from the left pane, export the calendar as .ics file to somewhere you will remember it.  We will come back to this file in a bit

export-calendar-2

Inside Owncloud logged in as Admin User

1. Make sure that the calendar app is showing up in the list of icons when you hit the top left part of the screen.  If it’s not, click the plus sign and search for it and ‘enable’ it.

add-apps-owncloud-2

2. Click the home button top left and make sure the calendar icon is showing in the drop down as per the screenshot below

owncloud-calendar-app-2

3. Go to ‘user’ under the option list on top right and add a new ‘user’ for yourself.

 

Note: if you are like me and want a very secure password for the storage of files on your owncloud server, than what I have done is created another user *just* for my calendar.  I won’t be using this ID to sync files or store them. The reason is that I found having a super strong password with lots of randomness is very difficult to deal with on a daily basis as you’ll be using it on a variety of different devices and possibly viewing it on a variety of different computers.  It’s up to you.

owncloud-create-user-2

4. Log in as your new ‘calendar user’ account and you will see an upload icon at the top.  Upload your .ics file that you made above (the one I said you’d be coming back to in a bit..)

owncloud-upload-file-2

5. You will see your .ics file appear with a nifty little calendar icon as well

owncloud-calendar-showing-2

6. Click the name part (not icon) of your .ics file as per screenshot above and an import dialogue will start

owncloud-import-calendar-2

7. Go ahead and click that bad boy called ‘import’.  Something will start.  Or does it? Or does it not? I keep getting this long pause while it seems like it’s frozen and hooped like this:

owncloud-long-pause-2

8. Joy o’ Rapture!  It eventually ends and things resume normally and give a message of success and victory

owncloud-close-dialgouge-2

9. Close that bad boy.  Now you will be able to go to the top left again to your new calendar.  If it was blank, don’t be surprised it’s blank… duh.

owncloud-calendar-app-2

 

10. Now you will get to see a share link associated with this on the left.  Click that, highlight it, and copy it to your clipboard.

owncloud-share-link-cal-2

Back in Thunderbird/Lightning

1. Go and create a new calendar yet again.  There may be a way to avoid this but I find it faster just to create a new one and delete the old one.

file-new-calendar-2

 

2. As the dialogue starts, choose ‘on the network’ as the option

tbird-on-the-network

3. Next. Now you’ll be given a place to paste in your owncloud shared link that you copied into your clipboard above.  Paste that in there.  Change the radio dial from iCalendar to CalDav

tbird-caldav-on-network

4. Name your precious new calendar.

tbird-01

5. You’re done!

tbird-calendar-finished

 

Now you have a calendar based on your owncloud server which syncs up with your Lightning running on Thunderbird.  I’ve found it to work perfectly so far.

I hope this helps you.

Perhaps if someone chides me I’ll write a blog about whether I ever find an Android option.  So far so bad. 🙁

Tags : , , , , , , ,

How to Migrate Thunderbird Lightning Calendar to Owncloud

I will expand this tutorial soon but I was able to figure it out from this.  Bug me if I haven’t updated this and clarified the details since this tutorial is not clear in a few ways

 

http://flailingmonkey.com/moving-contacts-calendar-google/

Tags : , , ,