Tag: Korean

How to Get Korean (Hangul) Working on Ubuntu 16.04

EDITED October 31, 2016

This tutorial might also work on Ubuntu 14.04, I haven’t tried yet.

I love Ubuntu and I love Hangul but I’m not going to deny it – it’s not hyper-easy to get it running on Ubuntu, not because it’s super hard but because there aren’t any helpful blog posts out there to walk someone through it.

By golly, miss molly, that ends today!  Let’s begin…

  1. Hit the super key and type ‘languages’ and then click/open the “language support” icon as per this:

01_language_support_in_dash

2. Click ‘install/remove languages’ as per this:

02_install_remove_languages

English should be selected already (if your mother-tongue install was English).

3. Choose “korean” from the list, then apply, and wait (a really long time sometimes) while it downloads King Sejong and the kitchen sink…

03_select_korean_from_list

EDIT! Some have reported not finding the Korean option in this list.  I cannot explain why this would be, nor have I experienced this, but I would recommend that if this is your case try logging out completely and logging back in and trying again.  Let me know if that helped.

Here is where the non-intuitive stuff starts.  You’d think doing the above would be all you need but you need to do a bit more.

EDIT! If you have tried this tutorial before, make sure you *log out* here completely and log back in or you might not see the next “Korean (Hangul) (ibus)” option.

4. Go to the top right of the screen where you see English (En) and click that and you’ll see ‘text entry settings’

04_text_entry_settings

Now you will English sitting there all alone.

5. Press the + sign and then type ‘korean’ and select it.  Then you’ll see a screen like this.  Choose Korean (Hangul) (Ibus).

05_adding_hangul_ibus

I had some issues leaving the ‘master keyboard’ (that’s a name I gave it) switching with the default (something with the super key) and so I changed mine to Control + space bar.  You can do whatever you want by just clicking in the space where the default is and hitting your favourite combo in on your keyboard.  When finished just close the window and your changes will be saved.

Remember, this is *not* the hangul-english keyboard language switching combo.  This is the keyboard combo that switches your keyboard from the “English only” (En) one to the “Korean with English capabilities” one.

06_changing_accelerator

Now, we’re getting close to being able to angle your Hangul, but just one more critical step that will save you the pulling out of multiple strands of hair.

6. You must now either reboot, or log out and log back in again in order to be able to eat your green eggs with Hangul.

You will know that you have successfully reached Hangul-Land when the top right area that used to say “En” is now a colourful Korean swirl like so:

07_korean_swirl

Although you now have full Korean capabilities, you now must use the keyboard combos found within this Korean keyboard in order to switch between English and Korean.  The default combo is shift + space bar, and you can try it out now for a fun test.  You may, like me, wish to change this keyboard combo to something else. If you do,  go on to the next section.

How to Customize Your Shiny New Korean Keyboard with a Custom Language Toggle Keyboard Combo

Click the colourful swirl and select ‘setup’ as per this:

08_hangul_customize

Next, you will see the Hangul toggle key space with the defaults. If you want to change the keys used to toggle between Korean and English, just click ‘add’ and then, even though it says ‘key’ singular in the pop up, you can hit the key combo with your computer and it will work.

*Warning!* It shows this popup when you hit ‘add’ under the Hangul toggle area, which is *incorrect*. It should say ‘hangul’ not hanja here. Both hanja and hangul display the same pop up box so it just needs a bug report to fix this but I’m too tired at the point of writing this blog…

10_incorrect_hanja_in_popup

In this case, I used control +right alt key because I remember using something like that back in the day and it felt comfortable.  You can do whatever floats your boat.

09_new_toggle_added

아이구! 신기 신기! 오렛동안 한국말 이컴퓨터에서 못했어….  드디어.

Hope this helps you grow in Ubuntu and Korean!

 

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Was Japanese Artist Sharaku Actually Korean Kim Hong Do?

Being married to a Korean it’s hard not to be interested in Korean controversial issues.  One of the more famous examples would be the Korean Dok-Do Island which Japan has given another name and tried to claim as their own.  It’s a glorified rock, but, of course, it represents nationality and borders so it’s pretty serious.

A new one that my student Eun Chae (ps. thanks for the free content!) introduced me to today is really interesting.  Without further adieu, here is her short essay on the topic which sums up well the ‘mystery’.

Enjoy.

—————————-

In Korea, if somebody asks who is the greatest painter in the country, most people would answer ‘Kim Hong Do’. Kim Hong Do was a painter working for royalty, many artists at that time wanted to be him and sometimes they drew the same landscapes. In Japan, one of the most famous painters is ‘Toshusai Sharaku’. However, scholars cannot be convinced that Toshusai Sharaku is Japanese because he suddenly appeared in 1794 and worked only for ten months and disappeared. Some scholars suggested that Kim Hong Do might be Toshusai Sharaku for several reasons and as a result, there is a hypothesis that Toshusai Sharaku, who is the one of the best three portrait painters, was actually Kim Hong Do, the greatest artist in Korea.

The strongest evidence in support of the suggestion that Kim Hong Do is Sharaku, is that both Sharaku’s productive period and Kim Hong Do’s latency period are the same. Toshusai Sharaku suddenly appeared in 1794 and painted about 140 creations for ten months. Conveniently, at that time in Korea, King Jung Jo sent Kim Hong Do to Japan as a secret agent. Therefore, many people theorize that Kim Hong Do changed his name to Sharaku and drew paintings for financing his mission. In addition, it is difficult to establish where Sharaku was born or how Sharaku died. Thus it is no wonder that scholars hypothesize that the most the most convincing suspect is Kim Hong Do.

As a secondary piece of evidence to prove that Sharaku and Hong Do are the same person, both shared a similar painting method. Kim Hong Do had his own personalized brush stroke which, at the end of the stoke, curved up. Comparing the two painters’ drawings, Sharaku’s brush stroke line looks very similar to Kim Hong Do’s. Moreover, Kim Hong Do often drew Buddha with six toes in his painting, which is unusual. Surprisingly, Sharaku also drew six toes on his Buddha, exactly the same way Kim Hong Do drew.

Some of Sharaku’s poems were translated into the Korean language of that era, which was unusual. Some of Sharaku’s Japanese poems made no sense when they were read by the Japanese reader. However, when Sharaku’s poem translated into the Korean language of that time, it was perfectly comprehensible. In addition, found within one of Sharaku’s poems, there are a word ‘danwon (단원)’ , which is a reference to his nick name. Furthermore, spanning across the breadth of his various works are other subtle references to the man Kim Hong Do.

In conclusion, Sharaku and Hong Do have several things in common, including their perfectly matching productive and latency periods, their painting methods. To cement the evidence, the blazingly obvious references of Hong Do in Sharaku’s poetry and the clearly Korean literary style leave little doubt that they are one and the same However, even with the existence of such strong proof, there have not been found any official documents in either countries conclusively proving that Sharaku was indeed Hong do. This topic has become an increasingly popular topic in both Korea and Japan after both respective countries aired mystery shows alluding to the possibility of the shared identity. Neither countries boldly took a position but instead simply left the strong inferences for the viewer to decide.

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Echolink for Amateur Radio: Why is it still the best kept secret?

I’ll admit that I’ve been a weekend warrior ham man for too many years.  I’m definitely not the guy to have the right to complain about anything based on my participation in the community.

That said, my name is VE7CAK and I’m back.  And I’m here to stay – God willing and the creek don’t rise.  Special thanks to VA7OBI for re-igniting my airwaves and for the folks who set up the Burnaby 147.060 repeater with the kick (_!_) coverage.

Echolink has always been mysteriously well hidden – even in the midst of ham-sters. I’m not sure why but here are my guesses:

  • Real radio men believe internet-connected radios are for sissies.  I partially agree. If you can’t do it with your own radio and antennas then you are relying on some ISP (Internet Service Provider)
  • Club members who pay for the hardware and service don’t want outsiders to figure out how to use their gear (highly unlikely)
  • The Echolink material was written for the people who set up and maintain the node, not for the end user.  They just have to figure it out (quite likely).
  • The likelihood of someone using a radio to connect to the Echolink node using DTMF tones versus those who will connect with an app on their smart phone are far less so all energy and instructions are focused on the appy people.
  • The original software was designed for the ever-proprietary Windows OS only so you are dealing with people who don’t know how to think for themselves, let alone help others think.  If it was designed for Ubuntu there would probably be a feature length instructional video by now and it would be integrated in the operating system (That was just a mini-rant).

Regardless, we need to pull together as real radio men (and women, and children) and make this Echolink thing more approachable so we can start connecting more.

The following are the areas that I realized are missing or lacking in Echolink. I will post the results of my research right after I summarize the points and hopefully this can remain a ‘live document’ so I can update it as I learn more:

  1. A super clear tutorial about how to connect from your radio (ie. mobile in your car) to the Echolink node, and then off to wherever you want to chat in the world.
  2. There is no Echolink software in the Ubuntu Software Center.  I wish I could program!
  3. There is no place, it seems, where you can go for a language translation of amateur radio terminology.  I thought I would try to connect to a South Korean Echolink node and realized I didn’t know how to say “VE7CAK monitoring” in Korean.  I could speak a basic conversation but I didn’t have this kind of terminology.  This probably wasn’t relevant at all ten years ago but Echolink has literally revolutionized the posibilities.  Here is a quote from their site:

     There are more than 200,000 validated users worldwide — in 151 of the world’s 193 nations — with about 5,200 online at any given time.

  4. Within the Android Echolink app, the nodes don’t display their node numbers!  This is kind of amazing to me.  I *must* be wrong….

Here is the evolving and improving document as I [hope to] find solutions to these challenges:

  1. A super clear tutorial about how to connect from your radio (ie. mobile in your car) to the Echolink node, and then off to wherever you want to chat in the world

I thankfully found a snippet of a post from this forum which seems to answer my question.  I haven’t had a chance to make it work yet but I hope to do so soon:

KE7VLC
10-06-2010, 06:39 PM
hey all, this might be a dumb question, but do you need a computer to use echolink on the radio? if not, how do you use it?thanks guysTo use Echolink you need one of two things. Either a radio that you are able to connect to a repeater that has Echolink capabilities…..or a computer.You can use an HT or a mobile radio that has a DTMF pad to connect to a repeater….if it has the capabilities of connecting to the internet and has an Echolink node. All you need to have is the node number of the other repeater or station you want to connect to. For example driving down the highway the one repeater you can reach has the capability, all you would have to do is key up and keep holding it down while you are punching in the DTMF (the repeater owner should advertise this but if you can’t find it then you will have to ask around) that keys up the Echolink program connected to it then punch in the node number and let off the key. The repeater should announce that it has connected. Then you transmit just like any normal QSO on a repeater. Once done with the ragchew just follow the directions to drop the node. Make sure you ask if anyone is using the repeater first and wait a min or so for a response….if not then announce that you are trying to activate Echolink and proceed. Once you are finished let everyone know that you are done using the repeater. It’s really close to the same proceedure for a phone patch.If you don’t have a mobile radio or an HT OR a repeater in the area that has a Echolink sysop then you will have to use a computer. Echolink requires an internet connection so it’s obvious why someone wouldn’t want to set one up….especially if there is no internet connection near the repeater.Hope this helps.
2. There is no Echolink software in the Ubuntu Software Center.  I wish I could program!
A pathetic workaround solution is to use a virtual box, install windows in that, and then install Echolink there.  This is annoying because you need the virtual box running every time you want to monitor repeaters which could be every time you turn on your computer.  Alternatively you could use Wine and install it.  I’m sure I saw some tutorials about that around the internets.
3. There is no place, it seems, where you can go for a language translation of amateur radio terminology.  I thought I would try to connect to a South Korean Echolink node and realized I didn’t know how to say “VE7CAK monitoring” in Korean.  I could speak a basic conversation but I didn’t have this kind of terminology.  This probably wasn’t relevant at all ten years ago but Echolink has literally revolutionized the posibilities.  Here is a quote from their site:

 There are more than 200,000 validated users worldwide — in 151 of the world’s 193 nations — with about 5,200 online at any given time.

I was really surprised about this one.  I searched pretty high and pretty low for Korean.  There are 55 nodes in South Korea so I figured there *must* be some document with relevant ham words in Korean and English but I was mistaken.  I will attempt to first search for it from the Korean side, failing that, I will build the document over time.  I’m sure other languages have the same issue so it might be nice to team up on the English vocabulary ‘master list’ and then just translate that to other languages.
4. Within the Android Echolink app, the nodes don’t display their node numbers!  This is kind of amazing to me.  I *must* be wrong….
For now, you can go to this web page and use the control+F feature to search out repeaters and locations: http://www.echolink.org/logins.jsp  It’s also very good for you to know about this link where you can search for the closest Echolink-enabled repeaters in your part of the world.  Just click the last radio dial that says ‘show links near’ and enter in your information.  Pretty great resource.  You can now reference all this information back to your Echolink smartphone app.  It’s ridiculous that you can’t just get all these deets from the node in the app…. but…
**Update 1: If you happen to live in BC, click this link to see all the Echolink nodes in the province.  Click the frequency to see all the details related to that repeater, for example, how to turn Echolink on or off – I suppose.
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Bangus Spanish Style

I’m trying to grow up.  Really, I am.  The problem is that I keep running into things that make my inner 12 year old laugh.  Thanks to a Spanish company, I’ve immatured again.

This blog is only really funny if you are Korean or if you have studied Korean a bit.  It also may qualify as funny if you are into linguistics.  If you find bodily humour or toilet humour funny, this also may be acceptable to you.

In Korean, the word for fart is ‘bangoo’ or ‘bangu’ – the great part is that I don’t know how to Romanize it.  Here is the straight Hangul for you if that helps you:

방구

So, let’s see the different kinds of bangus this company produces:

As you can see from our featured image and the gorgeous lady, you can get Gourmet Bangus.  You can tell by looking at this striking lady that she knows Gourmet Bangus and won’t settle for less.

There are also the Spanish Style Bangus.

 

bangus_spanish_style

 

Don’t forget the Bangus that come straight from the Belly!

 

bangus_belly

 

But without a doubt, this one made my inner 12-year-old crying and gasping for air from laughter.  I’ve since recovered.  I hope your inner Korean 12 year old will laugh as well.

 

bangus_chunks

 

So, forget ‘Oppa Gangnam Style’.  This is “Bangu Spanish Style!”

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