Category: Ubuntu

How to Get Korean (Hangul) Working on Ubuntu 16.04

EDITED October 31, 2016

This tutorial might also work on Ubuntu 14.04, I haven’t tried yet.

I love Ubuntu and I love Hangul but I’m not going to deny it – it’s not hyper-easy to get it running on Ubuntu, not because it’s super hard but because there aren’t any helpful blog posts out there to walk someone through it.

By golly, miss molly, that ends today!  Let’s begin…

  1. Hit the super key and type ‘languages’ and then click/open the “language support” icon as per this:

01_language_support_in_dash

2. Click ‘install/remove languages’ as per this:

02_install_remove_languages

English should be selected already (if your mother-tongue install was English).

3. Choose “korean” from the list, then apply, and wait (a really long time sometimes) while it downloads King Sejong and the kitchen sink…

03_select_korean_from_list

EDIT! Some have reported not finding the Korean option in this list.  I cannot explain why this would be, nor have I experienced this, but I would recommend that if this is your case try logging out completely and logging back in and trying again.  Let me know if that helped.

Here is where the non-intuitive stuff starts.  You’d think doing the above would be all you need but you need to do a bit more.

EDIT! If you have tried this tutorial before, make sure you *log out* here completely and log back in or you might not see the next “Korean (Hangul) (ibus)” option.

4. Go to the top right of the screen where you see English (En) and click that and you’ll see ‘text entry settings’

04_text_entry_settings

Now you will English sitting there all alone.

5. Press the + sign and then type ‘korean’ and select it.  Then you’ll see a screen like this.  Choose Korean (Hangul) (Ibus).

05_adding_hangul_ibus

I had some issues leaving the ‘master keyboard’ (that’s a name I gave it) switching with the default (something with the super key) and so I changed mine to Control + space bar.  You can do whatever you want by just clicking in the space where the default is and hitting your favourite combo in on your keyboard.  When finished just close the window and your changes will be saved.

Remember, this is *not* the hangul-english keyboard language switching combo.  This is the keyboard combo that switches your keyboard from the “English only” (En) one to the “Korean with English capabilities” one.

06_changing_accelerator

Now, we’re getting close to being able to angle your Hangul, but just one more critical step that will save you the pulling out of multiple strands of hair.

6. You must now either reboot, or log out and log back in again in order to be able to eat your green eggs with Hangul.

You will know that you have successfully reached Hangul-Land when the top right area that used to say “En” is now a colourful Korean swirl like so:

07_korean_swirl

Although you now have full Korean capabilities, you now must use the keyboard combos found within this Korean keyboard in order to switch between English and Korean.  The default combo is shift + space bar, and you can try it out now for a fun test.  You may, like me, wish to change this keyboard combo to something else. If you do,  go on to the next section.

How to Customize Your Shiny New Korean Keyboard with a Custom Language Toggle Keyboard Combo

Click the colourful swirl and select ‘setup’ as per this:

08_hangul_customize

Next, you will see the Hangul toggle key space with the defaults. If you want to change the keys used to toggle between Korean and English, just click ‘add’ and then, even though it says ‘key’ singular in the pop up, you can hit the key combo with your computer and it will work.

*Warning!* It shows this popup when you hit ‘add’ under the Hangul toggle area, which is *incorrect*. It should say ‘hangul’ not hanja here. Both hanja and hangul display the same pop up box so it just needs a bug report to fix this but I’m too tired at the point of writing this blog…

10_incorrect_hanja_in_popup

In this case, I used control +right alt key because I remember using something like that back in the day and it felt comfortable.  You can do whatever floats your boat.

09_new_toggle_added

아이구! 신기 신기! 오렛동안 한국말 이컴퓨터에서 못했어….  드디어.

Hope this helps you grow in Ubuntu and Korean!

 

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Working with PDFs in Ubuntu

Ubuntu is by far the best operating system in existence.  One of the things that hasn’t been broadcast around much is how Ubuntu is also awesome for business.

If you run a business (or work in one) you will know that PDF files are one of the most standard documents that you work with, or would like to work with.  Here is a bullet proof list of things that I’m always dealing with and that Ubuntu solves:

  • people sending .jpg or .tiff or .png files instead of PDFs (unprofessional but a reality)
  • PDF files being way too big which is unfair to bandwidth, especially if someone will be downloading on a mobile (good percentage chance)
  • I need to split a bunch of pages, do something, and then glue them back together again and I don’t want to print it all and scan it
  • I need to watermark or stamp a PDF with something
  • I need to create a PDF from a word processing document or spreadsheet

These are just some of my regular issues, but great news!  All of them will be solved for you in this post, once and for all, and for free.

How to Compress a Big PDF File Without Killing the Quality

This one took me a while, but all you have to do is:

  1. open a terminal (if you don’t know how, click here)
  2. Navigate with the terminal to where your over-sized PDF file is (If you don’t know how, go to the section on “File & Directory Commands” on this page.)
  3. In the gobbly-gook that is sitting in step #4 below, change the ‘OUTPUTFILENAME’ to the name you want the resulting file to be named and the INPUTFILENAME to the name of the file that is too big and is sitting in the directory you just navigated to.
  4. copy this gobbly gook into your computer clipboard AFTER doing step #3 to it.  I would recommend pasting it to a separate text editor (like body of an email) first, do your changes, and then re-pasting it to the terminal) :  gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 -dPDFSETTINGS=/default     -dNOPAUSE -dQUIET -dBATCH -dDetectDuplicateImages     -dCompressFonts=true -r150 -sOutputFile=OUTPUTFILENAME.pdf INPUTFILENAME.pdf
  5. Copy your updated version of the gobbly-gook to the computer’s clipboard
  6. Paste it to the terminal with this *different* version of control V.  If you use the normal paste, it won’t work.  Do this: control + Shift (same time) then press ‘v’ and it will paste to the terminal.
  7. press the enter key and the process will run

You should now have a smaller PDF file that didn’t lose too much quality.  There are other versions of this command above which I found killed the quality too much. This one was great for me.

How to Convert a .jpg or a .tiff or a .png File to a PDF File

  1. Open a terminal (if you don’t know how, click here)
  2. Navigate with your terminal to where your .jpg or a .tiff or a .png files are (If you don’t know how, go to the section on “File & Directory Commands” on this page.)
  3. type ‘convert’ and then start typing the name of the file you want to convert.  *TIP: after you start typing the file name, you can press ‘tab’ and it will auto fill.  If it doesn’t completely auto fill it means there is another file name there similar so you have to type a few more letters and then ‘tab’ again.  This saves much time and errors.
  4. start typing the name of the file you want the newly created PDF to be named.  Likely it will be the same as the photo name which is great and convenient because you can use the same TIP above with the tab button and it will auto-fill it quickly.  Caution: if you use auto-fill make sure you change the last three letters to ‘.pdf’ so that it will actually open as a pdf!
  5.  Here is what an example command will look like before you press enter: convert photo_document.png photo_document.pdf
  6. Press enter

If you know how to do basic terminal navigation, this is truly a lightening fast process and super useful.  That said, there is probably a light conversion app out there that does this on Ubuntu and I’d like not to use the terminal if possible so please share

How to Take a Multi-Page PDF File and Split Them into Individual Files

  1. go to the Ubuntu software center search and get “PDF Sam” pdf_sam
  2. Use the ‘split’ feature
  3. Mess around with all the options (I don’t have time to do a full tutorial here)
  4. Enjoy!

How to Take a Multi-Page PDF File and Split Them at a Certain Point in the File

 

  • go to the Ubuntu software center search and get “PDF Sam” pdf_sam
  • Use the ‘split’ feature
  • Make sure you choose the ‘split after these pages’ and the file will ‘cut’ right there.  I haven’t tried it but I bet you could put a comma in there after each page number you want to split at and split a whole series of pages….
  • Enjoy!

 

How to Watermark or Stamp or Batch Adjust Multiple Pages on a PDF in 10 Easy Steps

Tutorial about how to stamp.

Tutorial about how to watermark.

How to Rotate All Pages in a Multi Page PDF File

I wrote this tutorial earlier for this one here.

How to Turn Anything You Can Print into a PDF Document (ie. Emails, web pages, etc)

I wrote this tutorial earlier for this one here.

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Easily Open a Terminal in Ubuntu

There are two ways:

1.  FROM THE LAUNCHER ON THE LEFT

On the left side of your Ubuntu machine you’ll see the vertical column of apps you can one-click open.  Usually the terminal is here.  It’s the black box thing with the right-pointing greater than symbol thing and underscore.  Click it.  It opens.

terminal_on_left

2.  THROUGH THE DASH

  1. push your super key (aka ‘windows key’ if you have a redeemed machine)
  2. start typing ‘terminal’
  3. it shows up
  4. click it with mouse or use arrow keys to navigate to it and push ‘enter’ key
  5. it opens

terminal-in-dash

If opened it looks like so:

terminal_open

Tags : , , ,

Flat, Convex, or Concave Earth? It Depends on Your Lens

This video was sent to me as I have a strong interest in the topic of whether the earth is a ball or a flat surface.

As I journey towards truth, popular sources still tell me it’s a ball but all my senses tell me it’s immovable and flat…

The first thing that caught my attention was at 1:23 into the video the narrator said “His work was rewarded when NASA commended his work.”

When I reviewed the video again, the second thing I noticed was the incredible variation of curvatures.  These three images, are three different screen shots from the very same video. Go look for yourself…

convex_flat_concave_earth_curvature

The top is clearly concave.

The middle, as flat as a pancake.

The bottom, “NASA convex”

Something is fishy here and methinks it’s the lenses.

My conclusion is that this craft was outfitted with a fish eye lens (from now on lightly dubbed ‘fishy lens’) and cannot be trusted as a what-you-see-is-what-you-get (“WYSIWYG”) video result.

It also reinforced the fact that unless one personally inspects the camera equipment being loaded onto a craft, and personally confirms the final product has not been tampered with, one cannot fully trust the video results other than for non curvature-proving purposes.  I personally enjoy this video, but I cannot use it as any form of ‘proof of curvature’ – unless you believe the earth is a bouncy castle (that sounds really fun, by the way).

This video by Rob Skiba is another great one that shows amazingly weird effects that camera lenses have on the surface of the earth.

This also highlights the growing need for a ‘freedom approach’ to these projects where free software (publicly available source code, built by community) runs everything.  Ubuntu with Snappy Ubuntu and ability to run on very small devices is one example I see fitting well here.  As we get further and further buried under technology and information, the more we all need to take an active role in maintaining the freedom of said information.

Can we fully trust NASA to give us the untampered photos, videos, and live feeds that we need to make such important world view decisions?

Based on what I have seen so far, I would boldly say ‘No.”

It’s time for an increase in WYSIWYG community-built projects to find out for ourselves what our world looks like.

Tags : , , , , , ,

Ubuntu Phone About to Shake Things Up

I’ve been an Ubuntu fan since 2009 now.  As soon as I met Ubuntu it was game over for all my desktops, laptops, netbooks, home media servers, etc.  There was no competitor who could make a new or existing machine run so quickly and reliably, and without the pain of viruses and continual financial investments to keep it up to date.  The most exciting thing was that no one owned me.  When I heard that Ubuntu was moving to the phone, I purchased a Nexus 4 (N4) so that I could go along for the ride, as that was the first device for development.

I flashed it on, and took it for a ride.  The first thing I noticed was how amazing the user interface was.  It was as if (shocking as this may sound) someone had actually designed a phone with the user in mind.   When I was forced to use a fruit-phone by the big fruit company for a job once, it was like driving a luxury sports car with one arm cut off and in a cement warehouse:  high quality hardware, perhaps, but I’d rather have my freedom and functionality, thank you.  The big US spy agency phone (google/android) not only spied on me, but also has a user interface experience that never quite made sense.  It was (and still is) difficult to do some basic setting changes.  I tried cyanogen mod as a bit of a ‘lesser-of-two-evils’ but it too had the same issues because ultimately it’s all built on the same shaky foundation.

Ubuntu, on the other hand, is built with freedom and people in mind.  Randall Ross wrote a great post a while back about the pillars of Ubuntu (seven P’s) This article really helps us understand why Ubuntu is not just software.  Randall has been preaching this message for years but only now it’s starting to really hit home with some people.  People are starting to ‘get’ that they have been sold a bad deal for computers (Ubuntu has already taken over that show) but now also the computers we carry in our pockets.

As a business owner as well as sales person for our company, I will not deny that there were some bumpy roads in the beginning.  I needed some basic things that a smart phone could offer which were a bit buggy when Ubuntu launched on the phone a few years back.  I would flash back and forth between the bondage robot (android) and Ubuntu on my N4 while I tried to do my sales job.  No battle is easy and it was never promised to be so.  Some naysayers would laugh and say ‘why don’t you just wait until they have fixed it’?  This would anger me because “relying on they” is what has caused the world to be enslaved by their technology.  I knew that I could not wait for ‘they’ to fix things.  I had to become part of the solution somehow.  So I would stay up to date the best I could, periodically flash in and out and watch the growth. I would offer my feedback and needs to the developer groups and to my surprise, I found out that I wasn’t alone.  Others were listening, fixing, building, changing, debating, enhancing and more.  I realized one very exciting thing – I was and still am part of what is a major revolution in technology.

A revolution?  Isn’t that word a bit strong?

No, it’s not.  Do you remember just a few years ago when every phone in every pocket was either a Blackberry or a Nokia?  It wasn’t that long ago.  I believe it was around 2006, perhaps.  Their day is over.  A revolution occurred, albeit perhaps not one that has not helped the world.  The employees at Blackberry and Nokia felt the revolution and when it came time to renew your nasty cell phone contract, you felt the revolution too.

But this revolution is different.  This one comes without catches, snags or enslavement.  This one allows you to finally have some control over your phone instead of it and ‘they’ having control over you.  Now tell me that that is not a revolution?  Unless your head is really deep in the fruit and robot sand, you will be nodding your head in agreement with me and looking painfully at the ‘nice phone’ you just bought.

And so we are at another turning point.

How do you know when it’s a turning point?  For me it’s when the ‘thing’ moves from the underground to the masses.  It’s the point when it starts to ‘peek out’ and when ‘regular people’ start to acknowledge that something is happening.  For me, it’s when the mainstream media has *no choice* but to start covering it or be forced to lose respect.

I believe today is the day.

This article on a very mainstream technology website (you can tell it’s mainstream by the nasty ads for Microsoft, etc, that interrupt your reading) covered the revolution.  This article explains how the excitement is now here.  The author is unable to deny that something is going on.  He is unable to restrain from wanting to be involved.

The timing on this article was also interesting for another reason.  It perfectly confirmed advice I gave to a friend who is in the middle of launching a kind of ‘uber business’.   He launched his business with the traditional iOS and Android ‘app’ approach.  He wanted to show it to me and so he instructed me to ‘download the app’.  After a short discussion, I explained to him that this business model may be outdated and on the way to extinction.  I did not want to be forced to give a big bad company my information (including GPS location!) to explore my friends business on my phone. I explained politely that he was violating my privacy.  By the end of the conversation, I believe that he took my advice to *strongly consider* moving his development to the Ubuntu platform – a place where he will be immediately received with a warm embrace, not to mention a place that is future proof.

Every business that uses technology (and I believe that is *every* business) needs to seriously consider where they will be in three years.  The way of the fruit and the slave robot is now over.  With the Meizu Pro 5, there is now a very exciting and viable option out of the box.  There are no more excuses to not jump in with all support.  Not only will you bring more freedom to your customers but you will also sleep better at night knowing that the future of your success is not in the hands of a few very powerful people.

Today is a new and very exciting day for the Ubuntu project.

 

Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

How to Back up and Move from One Email Server to Another

My goal:  Move my email safely from one email service provider to another (IMAP).

I was surprised that it wasn’t that easy to find a simple step by step tutorial out there to do this.  I hope this tutorial will help someone.  If your email account is old, this process may take quite a bit of time, so please allow a few hours or have a second computer to work on while the process is happening.

Pre-Migration Suggestions

-make sure no other inboxes on other machines are being used at this time (ie. mobiles, other computers)

-assumptions are that you have already using Thunderbird email client on your computer

-tutorials always work better if Ubuntu is your operating system

-if you have created local folders in Thunderbird (folders that reside on the computer itself and don’t sync with the email IMAP syncs) then note that these will not be affected but you should consider them in your back up procedures because they also will not be backed up

1. Create your new email service with new provider
This is pretty obvious, but just make sure it’s all set up and that it is an IMAP setup.  We will assume IMAP moving forward.  Make sure your user name and password are handy

2. Create a new email account in Thunderbird, name it ‘new email server’ (or something to distinguish it as new provider), and plug in the credentials as you set it up

Most good email service providers will have a dedicated tutorial about how to set up an email account with their company using Thunderbird.  If they don’t consider ditching them as a company because they are weird and probably useless and a recipe for future pain. If you can’t track it down, this one should get you going from the folks at Mozilla

HOW TO MANUALLY SET UP EMAIL ACCOUNT IN THUNDERBIRD

3. Make sure you subscribe to all IMAP folders on *both* old and new servers

QUICK TUTORIAL ABOUT HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO IMAP FOLDERS IN THUNDERBIRD

4. Click through each IMAP folder (inbox, sent, drafts, etc) and make sure all items are downloaded to target machine in Thunderbird

If you use multiple machines with your email, you should do this to make sure that this machine is up to date with email sync (ie. make sure that all your email machines have connected to the internet and synced up email).  Once you click through each email folder you’ll see the status bar showing progress of items downloading if any.  You may choose not to transfer your trash over (it is trash after all) but it works same way as any other folder.  Once you’ve clicked through each IMAP folder on *old/current* email provider and activity is over, proceed to the next step.  Please note the updates may take time if this machine has not been updated recently or at all.

5.  Select all items in folder

Starting with the inbox IMAP folder, press ‘control A’ which will select all the email messages in the inbox folder.  They will be highlighted so you  know they are selected.

6. Right click and ‘move to’ all the items to new server

You will see the new, nicely named server and it’s inbox when you right click.  You won’t, however, see the sub directories  like spam, drafts, etc.  Once you touch it with your mouse, however, they will appear.  Drop the inbox items into the inbox IMAP directory of new server. Please note, again, this will take time because the new email server is uploading the emails.  In my case it was about 15 minutes to do about 5000 emails.

7. Repeat steps 4-6 for the rest of the IMAP directories

8. Turn off old email, Turn on new

Once all the transfers are done, what I did was just change the Thunderbird password settings in my account settings to something incorrect so that my old email could no longer connect to the email server.  Then I simply started using the new email inbox as per normal.  I just wanted to make sure everything was transferred correctly before I go back and wipe everything associated with the old email inbox/account.

And that’s it. You should now have the old email server on your computer which is essentially disabled and useless and the new email server properly working.  You’ll also need to copy over your email signatures and all that stuff to the new server as a reminder.

Also note that when you are sending emails, if you don’t delete the old email server, there is a possibility that Thunderbird will default sending from the old one and receiving so you’ll have emails not working and you’ll think it’s broken.  That’s why naming the account something obvious is important because you can update those on the fly through the dropdown ‘reply-to’ field (from).  It will give you your old server and new server in the option list.

I think that covers it.  Enjoy!

Tags : , , , , , , ,

How to Make a Brother Printer and Scanner Work in Ubuntu

*THIS WILL UNDERGO SOME EDITS BETWEEN OCT 31st and Nov 4th, 2016.  If you can get some answers below, great, but hopefully next week it will be more clear and helpful to more models of printers.

*Make sure to read my edits below this before starting as some things have changed…

*many edits below!  don’t start till you’ve skimmed them all

*PRE-note: if you can buy HP it’s probably better for you.  If you like pain like me, or already have pain, read on.

For some reason Brother printers are kind of hard to make work in Ubuntu for me.  Especially the scanner part.  They claim to support ‘linux’ but it’s not typically plug in play for me.  However, they are ghetto cheap so I buy them and pay for the savings in set up pain.  Oh well.  But this time I’m wising up and I’m blogging this for myself (and mom) so that we can get it set up quicker when we do upgrades or machine changes.  The main issue always seems to be this:

  1. Install the drivers with the command line as per the ‘pretty decent’ generic software from Brother found here: LINK TO UBUNTU BROTHER PRINTER DRIVERS
  2. select ‘linux’select ‘Linux (deb’)’Choose ‘driver install tool’ if you can which gets both the printer and the scanner going.

    ‘Agree to the EULA and Download’

    save file.  it will go to your ‘downloads’ folder if you have not told your browser to download it somewhere else.  You will need to know this for the next part so take a moment after the download to confirm it downloaded and you know where it is.

  3. follow instructions that appear on brother site right after downloading drivers, but here they are as of today (make sure on their site it’s up to date and don’t fully trust mine).Step1. Download the tool.(linux-brprinter-installer-*.*.*-*.gz)The tool will be downloaded into the default “Download” directory.
    (The directory location varies depending on your Linux distribution.)
    e.g. /home/(LoginName)/Download

    Step2. Open a terminal window and go to the directory you downloaded the file to in the last step.

    Step3. Enter this command to extract the downloaded file:

    Command: gunzip linux-brprinter-installer-*.*.*-*.gz

    Step4. Get superuser authorization with the “su” command or “sudo su” command.

    Step5. Run the tool:

    Command: bash linux-brprinter-installer-*.*.*-* Brother machine name

    Step6. The driver installation will start. Follow the installation screen directions.
     

     When you see the message “Will you specify the DeviceURI ?”,

     For USB Users: Choose N(No)
     For Network Users: Choose Y(Yes) and DeviceURI.

    The install process may take some time. Please wait until it is complete.

  4. Do this:
    1. Open “/lib/udev/rules.d/40-libsane.rules” file with ‘sudo nano’ command
    2.  Add the following two lines to the end of the device list. (Before the line “# The following rule will disable …”):
    Copy to your computer memory this:
    # Brother scanners
    ATTRS{idVendor}==”04f9″, ENV{libsane_matched}=”yes”   <–Paste it in with the special ‘control+shift+v’ (don’t use just regular control+v) feature in terminal
  1. Reboot the machine (you can just type sudo reboot if you are still in terminal and want it done fast…)
  2. open simple scan software from dash and try a test scan

For me, without doing step #2 above the printer will usually work but not the scanner.

Which makes me wonder if there is really any Ubuntu support at all…

But my ghetto printer/scanner is doing its job so oh well.

Hope this helps!

 

——————————-

EDIT: May 30, 2016

So go figure. Based on my long history with Brother I didn’t even try the ‘plug and play’ approach with Ubuntu but I was pleasantly surprised this morning when I plugged in a different laptop to the network.  Here is what I did to nearly *instantly* connect the laptop to the printer (assuming you have already setup wifi option on printer):

  1. press super key and type ‘printer’
  2. add printer
  3. click my mouse on ‘network printer’ and wait (key is wait a few seconds)
  4. the brother printer (two options) showed up in the list.  I couldn’t see the IP address option one because my window was so small so expand the window. When I saw the one with IP address, I selected that one.
  5. do the next window and next, next whatever.  Test print? Yes.
  6. boom. I got paper.

Note: I had an issue with the printer working via wifi and then not the next day so stay tuned here as I battle this out.

Note 2: This method above *ALSO* worked for my USB plugged in computer (the one that is actually plugged into the printer with a wire.  I did not need to seem to run through all the command line stuff as long as I wait a few seconds for the printer to show up.  The print function now works and it was near instant and plug and play.  Let me know if you have similar success or some issues.

——————-

EDIT 2: May 30, 2016

Unlike the advice from the post I found step #2 on originally, the Brother website has more detailed instructions as follows and I may have pasted the Brother lines into the wrong part of the file:

Ubuntu 9.10, 10.04, 10.10, 11.4, 11.10, 12.04, 12.10
1. Open “/lib/udev/rules.d/40-libsane.rules” file.
2. Add the following two lines to the end of the device list. (Before the line “# The following rule will disable …”):
If there is “LABEL=”libsane_rules_end””, add the following 2 lines before “LABEL=”libsane_rules_end””.The lines to be added—————————

# Brother scanners
ATTRS{idVendor}=="04f9", ENV{libsane_matched}="yes"
 
3. Restart the OS.
—————————

EDIT 3: JUNE 1, 2016

My new advice is to first simply try to install the printer with the ubuntu printer +Add printer option.  If you just need to print it seems, after all, that you can just just click the ‘network printer’ thing on the left and if you wait a few seconds the Brother printer will just magically appear.  The key is to wait a few seconds as it doesn’t appear right away.  If you need to scan you need to do all the steps above and make sure the scanner drivers are installed (command line).  So, if you have a laptop in your home network, for example, that just needs to print, you can do this:

  1. make sure brother printer wifi settings are done and it’s connected
  2. go to ‘printer’ from dash
  3. add printer
  4. click ‘network printer’ on left
  5. wait <— key
  6. when printer appears, select it (the one with the IP address if multiple ones show up)
  7. continue install wizard
  8. do test print

This worked for me.

I tried the same method of install for the scanner – USB plugged computer, and it worked, *except* that the *colour* scanning didn’t work.  So, if you only ever need B&W scanning and simple printing, you could also do the same method above with the native Ubuntu generic drivers and it should work like it did for me.  However, I needed colour scanning so I had to go back to my tutorial above, do all the command line things, and then boom. Colour started working following OS reboot.

Hope this helps.

Tags : , , , , ,

Are You a Victim of Abusive and Addictive Technology?

An article was forwarded to me this week by someone I know who believes strongly in the importance of ethical technology.  He is heavily involved in the Ubuntu project and we all share a desire to see a paradigm shift in the role of technology in our lives from that of a harmful consumable to a helpful benefit.

If you have looked down at your phone already since starting to read this blog you are a victim in the most serious way.  You can’t even focus for 30 seconds without running to the call of your taskmaster.

Before reading the article, I felt it would be beneficial to share some of the discussion that we had.  One friend suggested that people perhaps simply “don’t care”.  When that suggestion came I responded with this:

This issue is one of truth, in my opinion.

Everyone knows their phones own them. No secret. They know it whether they are in denial or not. So the issue is one of truth.

It seems that the same people who “don’t care”, also don’t seek out truth.  Seriously.  You have to be open-minded enough to realize that you could be the victim of someone with an agenda.

Most of the world hates truth.

“your phone owns you.”

possible response 1: yes it does. But what can you? (hears truth but rejects it by inaction)

possible response 2: no it doesnt. I’m in control. (liar)

possible response 3: yes it does. And I’m trying hard to get out of jail. (highly uncommon… like needle in haystack uncommon)

Compare this with:

“you shouldn’t eat sugar because it’s it’s bad for you”

possible response 1: Yes it is. but what can you do? It’s in everything?

possible response 2: I don’t eat that much. I’m not worried

possible response 3: yes, I know and I’m gradually reducing it from everything I eat/drink

Truth.

If someone loves truth it will be followed by action. Otherwise, you will see either denial/lying or submissive acceptance.

Now here is the article!

GREAT ARTICLE ABOUT ABUSIVE TECHNOLOGY AND HOW GOOGLE, FACEBOOK, LINKED IN AND OTHER COMPANIES MESS WITH YOUR MINDS AND LIVES.

 

Tags : , , , ,

Pronouncing Ubuntu Correctly Matters.

Mr. Joey Sneddon,

I don’t know you and I’m sure you are a really nice guy (you seem nice in some youtube videos) and that you mean well and probably think you are helping Ubuntu, however, you published this article called how to pronounce Ubuntu which I think is damaging to the Ubuntu project.

I’m not sure if you read my article on the same topic that I wrote about three years ago, but if not, here it is for you:

HOW TO PRONOUNCE THE WORD UBUNTU

Could you imagine if someone walked up and said I’m running ‘iose’ on my ‘iphonay’? (iOS/iphone)

The person who spoke such pronunciation would display that they are *not* in the community of participants.  They are clearly an outsider of the group.

So how you say the word *does* matter and saying it differently does *not* help unify the project.

And, as a final point of irony, apparently when I said your last name I pronounced it ‘Snay-don’ which someone said is incorrect.

I told them it doesn’t matter and I can just say it however I like.

Tags : , ,

Do All Tech Writers Suffer from Fear and Creative Paralysis?

Today I was reading a recent article on Forbes website by a supposed ‘contributor’ named Federico Guerrini.  Forbes, as you may know, is a popular place for people to go to try to get ‘informed’.  His article followed perfectly a kind of template that these ‘tech writers’ for popular media use when discussing Ubuntu.

The format, and you may have seen it before, looks like this:

  • I love Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu is great
  • Here are my recent articles to prove that I can talk tech and have credentials
  • Hardware, blah, blah, blah
  • Comparison with other operating systems, blah, blah
  • Other operating systems are ‘just a little better because they have more apps’
  • Apps are oxygen to our lungs and the reason that I live
  • <critical missing information about where the future is going
  • <critical missing information about non-tech things that matter to our world>

Are you serious, Federico?

Do you not remember when computers first arrived?  There were three ‘apps’ – a clock, a calculator and word processor.  Oh, wait.  No, there was also a game – Oregon Trail on a paper thin floppy disk thing – and it took 10 minutes to load…  And people were excited because these computers had the potential to change the world.

I remember just a short time ago when the most amazing mobile operating system was Nokia and Blackberry and now they are nearly distant memories.  And they all ‘had apps’.

Apps?  Seriously, Federico?.  We need to move on past the apps, buddy.

Apps are just the fruit of people’s time and effort and a bunch of lines of code.  They are the result of people believing that the future of said operating system is strong enough and worthy enough or able to pay enough to compensate their time invested in writing the code.  That’s it.  Nothing more, nothing less.

So *the core issue is not the number of apps* but the faith of the people who write the apps and in what OS they believe in.  And you have clearly demonstrated, Federico, that you speak ‘I love Ubuntu’ out of one side of your mouth but on the other side you say ‘Ubuntu isn’t as strong as the others’.  These two messages cannot mix, but you try.

If Ubuntu was not in a fully functional, market-ready condition and still in the lab, I could more understand your position and your ‘warnings’ to stick to horrible operating systems, but, you are now out of line because Ubuntu is officially in the market – and really good, too, and standing up just fine against the big boys in terms of everything except number of apps.

Apps?  Seriously?  We need to move on past number of apps.  Especially when half of the apps on these established operating systems, and the operating systems themselves, steal your privacy and hurt your family.

It’s not about whether what you write about is true or not, either.  What you wrote about is true.  It’s what you did *not* write about that matters.  You did *not* write about how android and ios are really bad for you and your family and the world.  You didn’t write about that in your article.  You didn’t share the truth about how the privacy of the users of these systems are being raped and their information pillaged.  You didn’t even touch on it.  And that’s not very nice to people who don’t know, Federico.  Especially when you do know.  And if you say you love Ubuntu, you do know, Federico.

But what is most saddening, is that you didn’t write about the bright future of Ubuntu and where it’s going.

Ubuntu and convergence will merge all your devices into one.  It will be the go-to operating system for the world and very soon, too.  Major operating systems have even started to try to work Ubuntu into their operating systems (behind the scenes of course) because they know their funeral date is near.  You also didn’t mention how Ubuntu is the *safest* operating system on the market.  It is respectful of privacy and its users.  It doesn’t do things to you without asking.  You also didn’t mention that Ubuntu is community built and that the community will continue to shape the system (including the mobile) into something that the people actually want, not what a bunch of boardroom execs want to push out.

Ubuntu is the best thing to ever hit the world of computing, and if you say that you like/love Ubuntu, you need to share the truth when you write, not just pander to these well-funded corporations and media outlets.

I know you are scared to step out of the boat alone.  I know it’s scary to come out against the masses, but I dare you, Federico, to use your God-given creativity and a little courage and write the truth in your next article and help change the world into a better place and inspire the world to help us get past the dysentery of Oregon Trail.

Tags : , , , , , ,